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Hey, users! 👋 Quite a lot of you here, almost 300 nodes. Can you please explain your use cases of the software? Why is it better than posting thoughts in any long-format Fediverse network? AFAIK, WriteFreely has no notifications in web interface. It doesn't show followers (except the count). It shows no comments under posts inside the interface. Do authors answer to comments from other apps? Don't you miss comments from your readers? Or is it supposed to be a one-way train?

@lightone

Hi! I just started a new instance of Writefreely this week.

Is important because our mastodon instance (bantu.social) are open just for now-white people who speak Portuguese. And Writefeely is a great way to let people write without dev knowledge and without using big platforms like WordPress or Medium.

@lightone
Actually it's very rudimentary I agree.
I like my blog posts directly posted on Fediverse with use or #hashtags and @mentions so I wait for more but I'm happy with what I have now.
I don't care about the numbers. I just want to know what I write is useful. Indeed I could miss something without notifications or fediverse's comments under my blog post.

@lightone
Can you please explain your use cases of the software?

A book-format (earliest post first) blog: write.as/economic-networks/
or in the fediverse @economic-networks

> Why is it better than posting thoughts in any long-format Fediverse network?

1. Stays in one place, does not scroll off into the past of the timelines.
2. I can share links to the blog or any of the posts with anybody whether in the fediverse or not.

Continued...

@lightone
...continued:

> Don't you miss comments from your readers? Or is it supposed to be a one-way train?

I do miss comments from readers. Had hoped that the blog having a fediverse identity might draw comments and larger conversations here. So far, not yet. Might be the topic or my writing doesn't attract feedback. Or could be the blog fedi identity does not work as I hoped.

But it was an experiment, and so far it works for sharing with non-fedi peeps.

@economic-networks

@lightone @write_as an interesting question. Worthy of a blog post on my write.as blog I think. I have been on write.as for over a year. I love the simplicity and privacy. I do miss comments. Sometimes. I’ll try writing something up over there on why and how I use it. It’s catharsis for me and my blog simply exists to track my retired life in Southeast Asia and soon other places. It has no real purpose or meaning. Thank goodness!

@mpmilestogo @bhaugen @jeko @dobrado Thank you for your answers, and thanks to @write_as for resharing - which helped my question reach WriteFreely users! From your answers, I conclude that you like its minimalistic, distraction-free interface which is more important than followers' feedback (though your answers show that you'd appreciate ways to interact with readers). I dare to hope that WriteFreely will add some comment support and answering inside its web interface in the future 🙂

@lightone
> , I conclude that you like its minimalistic, distraction-free interface which is more important than followers' feedback

No, I liked that it was part of the fediverse, even in a small way. I wanted to write a blog anyway, so I thought I would try it as a fedi experiment.

No luck with fedi feedback yet, though.

@mpmilestogo @jeko @dobrado @write_as

@bhaugen @write_as Fediverse heavily relies on hashtags. WriteFreely's interface has no special input for post hashtags (which could federate together with post preview), so users following tags don't see these posts. That may be one reason why blog posts get less feedback (than they might otherwise from wider Fediverse). Another reason might be that authors simply don't notice they have comments :) But I see you're following your WriteAs blog from Mastodon which helps not missing comments!

@lightone
> Fediverse heavily relies on hashtags.

I haven't personally relied much on hashtags but @write_as could probably figure out a way to add them to the toot for a new blog post.

> following your WriteAs blog from Mastodon which helps not missing comments!

That was my hope... but seems also likely that if my blog did allow comments, nobody would comment anyway...

@bhaugen @lightone #WriteFreely actually does federate hashtags! You can simply include them in the post, along with any fediverse mentions. (Example: matt.writefreely.dev/some-fede)

Mastodon doesn't surface hashtags included in an ActivityPub `Article`, but the posts will show up in search results for the tag. You can also mention yourself to continue discussions in the fediverse -- replies just won't show up on your blog.

@write_as Clarification: such posts will show up in Mastodon search, and they will also be delivered to users subscribed to this tag? If I "pin" some hashtag in Mastodon, will I get WriteFreely posts with that tag into my column (assuming my server knows of WriteFreely server)? @bhaugen

@write_as Great! Now the important thing is for WriteFreely writers to use relevant hashtags more often. :) @bhaugen

@lightone
I pay very little attention to hashtags in the fediverse unless some people I know and trust use them. And then I can't think of a case where they made much difference. No hashtag campaigns or anything like that.

I am looking at my timelines now and see maybe a couple of toots where the hashtags add anything.

Am I missing something?

How do you use them?

@write_as

@bhaugen I follow about 20 hashtags in Mastodon (search for tag, pin it in new column and thus monitor posts containing it). It's impossible to follow all users who may talk of things I care about, easier to follow all posts with those tags. As for campaigns - made only one so far; it was tiny, but successful :) We asked users to use 2 special tags in their posts dedicated to the event - that helped to find their posts and reshare them: mastodon.xyz/@lightone/1041881 Tags are useful! @write_as

@lightone
Thanks. I haven't gotten into tags yet, but then I am old and slow...your examples are useful.

And I never used twitter so don't have that experience.

@write_as

I wanted to shift to #write_as for writing stuff. But because it did not support commenting from other networks, I did not.
I use #hubzilla , which has #articles , #webpages , #notes,#calendar #events , #polling ,#qrcode for posts, #bookmarks , #categories , disabling #comments , #scheduling #posts , #saving posts , #wiki pages , #forums , #webdav #cloud for smooth file uploading , #gallery for #pics , set #expiring posts , #password protected posts , giving access to other users for #collaborated #writing , #ldap support , #rainbow #tag #cloud for #searching posts with the #hashtags , #themes , #sorting by #comments , #privacy #groups to post to only particular viewers , support for both #bbcode and #markdown , creating of different #accounts by one main account so you can have tech_new , daily_news admin by one account and my favorite the #friends #bar which helps you to #filter your posts on your #wall according to the #priority . I can go on and on, but these are my favorite ones.

@lightone @bhaugen @jeko @dobrado @write_as

Only for me yes. I prefer the minimalistic and privacy aspects. I would like comments. Sometimes. Write.as will get comments and we can decide to activate or not. The most important thing for me is the experience writing. I write to create. If some find the words interesting that’s good too but it’s not the primary thing for me. I don’t use tags in writing although I could easily enough.

@lightone
The reason to use a macro-blog like WriteFreely is that the Mastodon micro-blog is too ephemeral. Issues only trend for minutes or hours and then are consigned to the past. There is almost no interaction with toots that are more than a day or two old.
Also the attention span on the timeline is short. A macro-blog is more likely to be read and properly digested.

On a side note unfortunately my blog has been sitting idle: @fediverserising
posts created before the accnt don't show up cc: @write_as

@lightone @write_as

I use it because I wanted:

1. an email newsletter that people can also just go to on the web like a blog

2. allow people to also subscribe by fediverse

3. to financially support a fediverse related cool thing

I have zero interest in publishing comments and removed them from my main blog years ago because I find they add nothing useful and encourage quick, well, comments rather than e.g. a full blog post in reply.

@lightone

i haven't used write.as, but from my experience with self-hosted wordpress, i'd say a really big draw for me would be formatting in posts. headings, non-ugly links, sometimes you really need a table and mastodon just can't do it

(personally i'm satisfied putting up simple webpages with nginx and using mastodon as a separate method to share them. largely because it's easier to preview my content offline and back it up than if i had to deal with a CMS or database)

@Valenoern There're two popular platforms specifically for blogging that are somewhat integrated in Fediverse: WriteFreely being one of them, Plume the other. They target different audiences (I think), but they both support markdown, so you might prefer them over Wordpress. My question was to understand use cases: WriteFreely became really popular, judging by the number of nodes! I think its target audience is tech-savvy people.

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