Contributing to free software requires privilege. Even regular contributors might sometimes find themselves without it.

Time, focus and money. You might find yourself lacking in one of these at various points in your life.

While software projects from startups move like streams, most free software projects move like glaciers. They move slowly but they keep moving for decades.

Being away from a project doesn't mean you have to give it up. You can join back later.

#FreeSoftware #Privilege

@njoseph
It's very unclear to me what you mean and what you are implying with the word privilege in this context.

@federico3 @njoseph seems pretty clear to me:

> Time, focus and money. You might find yourself lacking in one of these at various points in your life.

Hard to make this any more clear, in fact.

@rysiek I mentioned implications and context - which are not spelled out.....

@federico3 @rysiek Acknowledging your own privilege just means being grateful that you have been given chances that others might not have been given no matter how hard they worked.

It does not mean denigrating your own hard work or that of others.

It's a point of humility and a self-check to maybe not throw out a knee-jerk "meh, it's free software, patches welcome" the next time a person runs into an issue due to a sharp edge in some free software project. Maybe they have the opportunity to contribute. Maybe they don't. You don't know their life.
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@clacke @rysiek @federico3

Stating that something is free software and that patches are welcome is a statement of fact. I don't see anything wrong with that.

The flipside of this lecture in privilege is one about entitlement. Nobody (outside of my immediate family) is entitled to my time and energy in order to fulfill their needs, no matter how "privileged" they might think I am.

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